July 14, 2022

The Science Lab/ Kitchen Overlap

By Sharon Halkovics, Research Specialist

Years ago, I completed my undergraduate studies earning a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Health Science. I started down my career path assisting in a lab at a university. A couple of years later, I veered off course for a more hands-in-the-dirt experience and fell in love with small-scale farming. Farming led to working in restaurant kitchens then a culinary school, which eventually led to freelancing as a food stylist on large commercial accounts.

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The Science Lab/ Kitchen Overlap

July 8, 2022

A Morning in Working Woods

By Emma Dawson- Glass, Research Specialist

Have you ever wondered what the day-to-day of scientists looks like? Certainly, daily activities will vary greatly depending on what kind of scientist you are, what time of year it is, and where you work. For community ecologists in the Stuble Lab at the Holden Arboretum, the summer months means it’s time to get out into the natural area at Holden to collect data.

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A Morning in Working Woods

June 24, 2022

A virtual tour of the natural areas used by the research department

By Emma Dawson-Glass, Research Specialist

Beyond its curated collections, the Holden Arboretum also retains many natural areas. In fact, most of the Holden Arboretum property is made up of natural areas, with 3,000 acres out of a total of 3,600 acres of the Arboretum property being made up of natural areas. These natural areas are a vital resource to researchers and allows us to study a wide breadth of Northeast Ohio habitats. In these natural areas we study everything from community assembly, to responses to restoration and management, to the impacts of global change disturbances such as climate change, invasive species, acid rain, and novel diseases. Below, we highlight a few of the many natural area field sites that scientists in the Research Department use for study.

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A virtual tour of the natural areas used by the research department

June 16, 2022

New Eastern Hemlock Conservation Work Kicks Off at Holden

By Rachel Kappler, Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative (GLB FHC) Coordinator

Researchers across the country are interested in learning more about forest pests that threaten our native tree species. Populations of eastern hemlock, found across Appalachia, New England, and the Great Lakes, are faced with two different insect pests, hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale, that have killed nearly 80 percent of hemlocks in some areas.

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New Eastern Hemlock Conservation Work Kicks Off at Holden

June 9, 2022

A Virtual Tour of the Collections used by the Research Department

By Emma Dawson-Glass, Research Specialist

One of the greatest benefits of being a researcher at an arboretum is being able to access curated plant collections. Often, these collections have a well recorded history and can be sourced from all over the world. As such, researchers can ask many questions about plants, ranging from their evolutionary adaptions to their future responses to novel global change threats (like disease and climate change). Here, we highlight some of the collections at the Holden Arboretum that scientists in the Research Department use for study.

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A Virtual Tour of the Collections used by the Research Department

June 3, 2022

2022 Holden Summer Intern Program

By Emma Dawson-Glass, Research Specialist

The HF&G’s Research, Community Forestry and Conservation teams are excited about the arrival of the 2022 cohort of interns. This year, HF&G leverages resources and opportunities across departments and campuses to allow our interns gain the finest in knowledge, experience, and skills for future career success.

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2022 Holden Summer Intern Program

May 20, 2022

The Spring Ephemerals in Stebbins Gulch

By Sarah R. Carrino-Kyker, Postdoctoral Research Associate

Spring ephemeral flowers in the forest only bloom for a short period of time after the weather warms up from the winter, but before the trees in the canopy fully leaf-out and the light levels get lower on the forest floor. As such, our days of flower surveys are often long days in the field crammed together all in one or two weeks. This way, we can catch the plants before they go dormant again. But, these days of flower surveys are also ones when I have experienced some of the best natural beauty of the forests at Holden!

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The Spring Ephemerals in Stebbins Gulch

May 6, 2022

How to Clone a Tree

By Rachel Kappler, Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative (GLB FHC) Coordinator

How do you study a fully grown tree in a regular-sized laboratory? You collect a branch, take it back to the lab, graft it onto a much smaller tree, and study the clone. And that’s exactly what Holden researchers are doing with beech trees from all over the Great Lakes Basin. They’re making these clones because some trees from the region appear to be resistant to pests that cause beech leaf disease, and they want to understand why.

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How to Clone a Tree

April 21, 2022

New Research Collaboration Aims to Save Eastern Hemlocks

By Rachel Kappler, Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative (GLB FHC) Coordinator

Holden research launched a new initiative this year to help conserve eastern hemlocks. The Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative (GLB FHC) brings together the US Forest Service Northern Research Station in Ohio and the New Jersey Forest Service with Holden to focus on breeding eastern hemlock trees for resistance to pests.

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New Research Collaboration Aims to Save Eastern Hemlocks

April 21, 2022

Alexa Wagner Awarded a Phipps Botany in Action Fellowship

Holden Ph.D. Candidate, Alexa Wagner, has been awarded a Botany in Action Fellowship from Phipps Conservatory for her research in Working Woods. The title of her proposal is “Understanding the impacts of forest restoration on demographic shifts in the understory plant community.” This is the third year of funding and her third year as a fellow. As a part of the fellowship position, Alexa will spend a week at Phipps to partake in science engagement activities including Phipps staff, local K-12 grade youth, and the general public. “I look forward to this opportunity to increase science awareness and practice my formal and informal science outreach skills,” Alexa said.

Alexa Wagner Awarded a Phipps Botany in Action Fellowship

April 15, 2022

When an Ecologist is a Lab Rat

By Sarah Kyker, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Associate

What does the soil ecology lab at Holden have in common with a crime lab? More than you might think! In the soil ecology lab, we rely heavily on DNA sequences, just like crime labs. Crime labs use DNA sequences to match a suspect to a crime scene. We use DNA sequences to match species of fungi and bacteria to our forest soils. (Sidenote: We focus on bacteria and fungi in the soil because they are the most active decomposers!)

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When an Ecologist is a Lab Rat

April 7, 2022

Behind-the-Scenes Spring Phenology Monitoring

By Emma Dawson-Glass, Research Specialist

Spring is underway here in Northeast Ohio, meaning it’s time for the Stuble lab and our team of wonderful volunteers to get out in Bole Woods and start monitoring spring phenology. For those unfamiliar, phenology is the study of the timing of natural phenomena as it relates to seasonal changes. In our case, we’re monitoring the phenology of spring ephemerals—the wildflowers that come up in forest understories during the spring while the canopy is still open.

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Behind-the-Scenes Spring Phenology Monitoring

April 5, 2022

Holden Researchers Present at Society for Ecological Restoration Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter Meeting

This past weekend, Alexa Wagner, Emma Dawson-Glass, and Sam Harbol each presented at the annual chapter meeting for the Society for Ecological Restoration Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter. The presentations detailed current research on forest restoration in the Stuble Lab.

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Holden Researchers Present at Society for Ecological Restoration Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter Meeting

March 17, 2022

A short tale about hemlock trees, bacteria and a nasty insect.

By David J. Burke, PhD, Vice President for Science and Conservation

Many of us love our native hemlock trees (Tsuga canadensis). They are beautiful, but more than that, they serve an important ecological role in many of our forests. Where they are found along streams and waterbodies, they cool the water and maintain cold water habitat necessary for many types of aquatic life. In addition, they are important bird habitat, and many moths and butterflies are found only (or mostly) in hemlock. Quick fact: Did you know that hemlock trees can live to be 550 years old? Amaze your friends!

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A short tale about hemlock trees, bacteria and a nasty insect.

March 3, 2022

Science on Fridays with Holden: Final Lecture in Inclusive STEM Experiences Series

By Juliana S. Medeiros, PhD, Plant Biologist

What can we do to create more equitable and inclusive STEM educational systems? This year, the Scientist Lecture Series has featured speakers that have successfully run boots-on-the-ground institutional diversity initiatives. These leaders have strong records of advocacy and are employing innovative ideas to build anti-racist/anti-sexist programs, truly they are changing the system in support of a more diverse STEM workforce.

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Science on Fridays with Holden: Final Lecture in Inclusive STEM Experiences Series

February 23, 2022

Na Wei, Ph.D., is Lead Author on Publication in Horticulture Research

By Na Wei, PhD, Scientist

Holden Forests & Gardens Scientist Na Wei, Ph.D., and her collaborators from Oakland University and the University of Pittsburgh decoded the scent of flowers and its influence on flower microbes.

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Na Wei, Ph.D., is Lead Author on Publication in <em>Horticulture Research</em>

February 17, 2022

A story of becoming a scientist in the United States

By Na Wei, PhD, Scientist

Getting a PhD degree is never easy and perhaps more difficult for international students. One of the challenges that face many international students is visas, which grant our legal status to study in the United States.

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A story of becoming a scientist in the United States

February 10, 2022

Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science

February 11th is the UN’s International Day of Women and Girls in Science. In honor of this special day, we had a Q&A with some of our favorite HF&G staff members to reveal how they got into the science field and what advice they have for the younger generation.

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Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science

February 10, 2022

Get to know a scientist: Connor Ryan

By Emma Dawson-Glass, Research Specialist

Where do plants come from? No, we’re not talking about the birds and the bees or the sun and the soil. Many of our favorite ornamental plants have been specifically engineered to have showier flowers, grow taller, and resist disease, creating plants with little resemblance to their wild relatives. Ever wonder who comes up with these things, and puts them into practice? This week we talk to Connor Ryan – the Rhododendron Collections Manager within Holden’s Research Department – on how he got into collections and plant breeding.

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Get to know a scientist: Connor Ryan

February 3, 2022

Science on Fridays with Holden: Roadmaps to building equitable and inclusive research experiences in STEM

By Juliana S. Medeiros, PhD, Plant Biologist

What can we do to create more equitable and inclusive STEM educational systems? This year, the Scientist Lecture Series is featuring speakers that have successfully run boots-on-the-ground institutional diversity initiatives. These leaders have strong records of advocacy and are employing innovative ideas to build anti-racist/anti-sexist programs, truly they are changing the system in support of a more diverse STEM workforce.

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Science on Fridays with Holden:  Roadmaps to building equitable and inclusive research experiences in STEM

January 28, 2022

Evidence Based Gardening

By Connor Ryan, MS, Rhododendron Collections Manager

Lots of plants have problems in landscapes. Perhaps your Colorado spruce (Picea pungens) is losing all its lower leaves. Or your rhododendron’s stems keep dying. Or the leaves of your blueberry bush (Vaccinium) are completely yellow. How do you figure out what is causing the problem, and what is the solution? A common move for gardeners is to run to the local garden center, purchase fertilizer or a fungicide or an insecticide, and then use those products non-discriminately, praying that this will fix everything. While this can sometimes work, there resources for the average gardener to help address garden problems more effectively and sustainably.

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Evidence Based Gardening

January 27, 2022

Claudia Bashian-Victoroff Awarded a BGCI ArbNet Grant

Claudia Bashian-Victoroff was awarded the BGCI ArbNet Grant for her collaboration with the Yerevan Botanical Garden in Armenia. The project will analyze mycorrhizal fungus community composition on the roots of oak species growing in collections at both the Yerevan Botanical Garden and at Holden Arboretum. More information can be found here.   

Claudia Bashian-Victoroff Awarded a BGCI ArbNet Grant

January 20, 2022

Get to know a scientist: Samuel Harbol

This week we learn more about Samuel Harbol, this year’s Norweb Fellow working in Dr. Juliana Medeiros’ lab. This one-year research fellowship is named in honor of R. Henry Norweb Jr., the first executive director of Holden Arboretum and grandson of Holden’s founder Albert Fairchild Holden.

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Get to know a scientist: Samuel Harbol

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