October 1, 2021

Beech Leaf Disease and Forest Fungi: Healthy trees support healthy fungal communities

By Claudia Victoroff, MS, Graduate Student

Arboreta play an active role in studying a wide range of tree diseases and the pathogens and parasites that cause them. Holden is no exception. Work from our arboretum and in collaboration with a number of partners, especially the USDA Forest Service, has expanded knowledge on several tree diseases caused by parasites, including the hemlock woolly adelgid and the emerald ash borer.

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Beech Leaf Disease and Forest Fungi: Healthy trees support healthy fungal communities

September 24, 2021

Celebrating National Mushroom Month with a Book Review and a Recipe too!

By Claudia Bashian-Victoroff, Jessica Miller, Sarah Kyker, and David Burke

As September winds down, we are taking one more week to celebrate fungi during National Mushroom Month! Read more about the importance of mushrooms as well as a book review from Claudia Bashian-Victoroff. Celebrate the beginning of fall with one more delicious recipe to satisfy your mushroom cravings.

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Celebrating National Mushroom Month with a Book Review and a Recipe too!

September 17, 2021

National Mushroom Month: Sharing Some Science & a Recipe, Too!

By Claudia Bashian-Victoroff, MS, Graduate Student, Sarah Kyker, Postdoctoral Research Associate, and David Burke, VP, Science & Conservation

We continue to celebrate September as National Mushroom Month at HF&G! Today we want to tell you about our favorite fungal group: mycorrhizal fungi! While we certainly love all fungi, a large portion of the research in HF&G’s Soil Ecology lab focuses on the plant mutualists known as mycorrhizal fungi.

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National Mushroom Month: Sharing Some Science & a Recipe, Too!

September 10, 2021

Science on Friday: Soil, Mushrooms & a Recipe, Too!

By Claudia Victoroff, MS, Graduate Student

We continue to celebrate September: National Mushroom Month. Mushrooms are amazing (and delicious) and definitely deserve a month of focus and celebration. Today we’ll take a look at how soil and mushrooms interact and support each other.

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Science on Friday: Soil, Mushrooms & a Recipe, Too!

September 8, 2021

Breaking News: Pollinators contribute to flowering plant diversity

By Na Wei, PhD, Scientist

Holden Forests & Gardens (HF&G) Scientist Na Wei, Ph.D., and her collaborators from the University of Pittsburgh and East Tennessee State University discovered how pollinators may contribute to the maintenance of flowering plant diversity. This study that accelerates our understanding of biodiversity conservation is now published in the journal Nature.

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Breaking News: Pollinators contribute to flowering plant diversity

September 3, 2021

Science on Friday – A Book About Mushrooms & a Recipe

By Claudia Victoroff, MS, Graduate Student

With summer turning into autumn, September is a great time of year to see mushrooms in the forest. Mushrooms are a type of sporocarp, or the fruiting body of fungi, and the month of September offers just the right temperature and soil moisture for fungi to fruit. We love the beauty of the forest floor filled with sporocarps during September; it’s a great time of year for a mushroom foray! “What is a mushroom foray?” you might ask. It is an organized hike where a group of people head into the forest and look for mushrooms. Sometimes the group is organized to hunt for edible mushrooms; other times it is for a scientific study; and sometimes it is just to enjoy the beauty of the mushrooms! You can join us for a foray at Holden Arboretum on September 18th! The purpose of our foray will be to learn about Ohio’s native mushrooms and how to identify them and will be led by Claudia Bashian-Victoroff (register here). We hope you can join us for a fun morning!

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Science on Friday – A Book About Mushrooms & a Recipe

September 1, 2021

September is National Mushroom Month

By Sabrina Kozsey, Gardener

Happy National Mushroom Month!  

September is one of our favorite months at Holden Forests & Gardens. Why? Because it is National Mushroom Month. Many people celebrate National Mushroom Month by cooking and eating their favorite mushrooms. And we do too! But, we also celebrate the month by appreciating all that fungi do for forest health and the natural world around us. We have classes for you to take devoted to mushrooms and we’ll be posting on our blog all month long too. 

We launch the month with some incredible photographs of mushrooms found at the botanical garden taken by gardener Sabrina Kozey.  

Here we go! 

Prior to being a Gardener at the Cleveland Botanical Garden, I was lucky enough to work in natural areas that did not have public access. I found some fascinating fungi that I had never seen before. It sparked an interest in fungi and mushrooms and now wherever I go in nature I always keep my eyes peeled for a marvelous mushroom to photograph. Even though you can find some interesting ones in areas less travelled, there are also some pretty awesome ones where you least expect them along popular trails. I know fungi Is not the first thing on your mind when visiting a botanical garden, but you can often find some wonderful ones around here. I am brand new to mushroom identification, which I have discovered can often be quite difficult. So, I am not going to try and identify all these mushrooms I have found (hopefully in the future I can) but here are some of the mushrooms I have seen around the Cleveland Botanical Garden, Enjoy! 

 

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September is National Mushroom Month

August 23, 2021

What is in a Plant Physiologist’s Toolkit?: Measuring Photosynthesis

By Sharon Danielson, MS, Doctoral Graduate Student

If you are a plant lover, chances are you often find yourself thinking about photosynthesis in some way. You may move a house plant to a bright window so that it can use energy from light to fix carbon from the atmosphere and use that carbon to build tissues as it grows. Or, perhaps you want your vegetable garden to give you delicious tomatoes, so you choose the best conditions to maximize fruit production.

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What is in a Plant Physiologist’s Toolkit?: Measuring Photosynthesis

August 16, 2021

Researchers, Horticulturists, and Volunteers Team Up to Leverage Long-Term Pollinator Data

Pollinators are the friends of plants and people. Most flowering plants (~80%) are animal pollinated. Sadly, there is a global trend in pollinator declines, especially under the changing climates. To conserve pollinators, Holden Forests & Gardens has been monitoring pollinators at the arboretum since 2015.

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Researchers, Horticulturists, and Volunteers Team Up to Leverage Long-Term Pollinator Data

August 13, 2021

Climate Change and Earlier Springs – How Are Plants Responding Around the World?

By Katie Stuble, PhD, Scientist

Climate Change and Earlier Springs – How Are Plants Responding Around the World?

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Climate Change and Earlier Springs – How Are Plants Responding Around the World?

August 10, 2021

Katie Stuble is Lead Author on a Paper in BioScience

By Katie Stuble, PhD, Scientist

Holden scientist and research chair, Katie Stuble, has been exploring ways in which we can harness the power in biological data collected over time and across many sites to understand how climate change is impacting our natural world. A new paper stemming from this work has just been published in the scientific journal BioScience.

Stuble KL, S Des Roches, A Ambrose, KC Brown, H Cooper, T Hilton, B Sinervo, LR Fox (2021) Regional networks of biological field stations to study climate change. BioScience 71(8): 874-882.

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Katie Stuble is Lead Author on a Paper in BioScience

August 6, 2021

Claudia’s Travel Blog: A Research Excursion through Armenia

By Claudia Victoroff, MS, Graduate Student

When you think of the country Armenia, what comes to mind? Maybe you know of a few famous Armenians, such as Cher or the Kardashians. More importantly, you may know that President Biden recently became the first U.S. president to acknowledge the Armenian genocide, which began in 1915. What you might not know is that Armenia is an ancient and yet contemporary civilization situated within a biodiversity hotspot, the Caucasus Mountain range. The region is home to more than 6000 species of plants, 153 species of mammals and 400 species of birds, some of which are endemic (or exclusive) to Armenia. Armenia is home to large stretches of undisturbed primary forests and the Armenian people have a long history of land stewardship, and of intimate connection with the unique and beautiful landscape.

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Claudia’s Travel Blog: A Research Excursion through Armenia

August 6, 2021

Holden Researchers Present at ESA

Holden researchers have spent this week attending one of the world’s largest gatherings of ecologists: the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. This year, four Holden researchers are presenting their work into urban trees, forest management, and more.

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Holden Researchers Present at ESA

July 23, 2021

The Name Game

By Connor Ryan, Rhododendron Collections Manager

Much of the research we have historically done at the HF&G’s David G. Leach Research Station is directly focused on new plant development. We are trying to breed the next generation of rhododendrons for the gardening public. The scientific, horticultural, and business aspects of plant introduction could be written about ad nauseam, but today, I would like to discuss something at the intersection of all three – naming.

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The Name Game

July 16, 2021

Holden Students Reach for the Moon, Land Among the Stars

By Juliana Medeiros , Plant Biologist

One of the most important aspects of our work in the HF&G research department is mentoring students in independent research projects. Our research students include undergraduates and graduate students who come to us from the greater Cleveland area and beyond, to work on projects addressing important questions in ecology and evolutionary biology.

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Holden Students Reach for the Moon, Land Among the Stars

July 9, 2021

Annual SEARCH Symposium Held Virtually

Interns from the Research and Conservation departments presented their summer projects at the annual SEARCH symposium. This year, SEARCH was held virtually on July 9th and included online posters that are still available for viewing at Make:Projects.

Annual SEARCH Symposium Held Virtually

July 8, 2021

Biological Time Capsules

By Connor Ryan, Rhododendron Collections Manager

Science on Friday

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Biological Time Capsules

July 1, 2021

The Annual Bioscience Alliance Intern Fun Days Returned in 2021

By Courtney Blashka, David Burke, Juliana Medeiros, Sarah Kyker, Jessica Miller, Connor Ryan, Katie Stuble, Rebecah Troutman, and Na Wei

Science on Friday

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The Annual Bioscience Alliance Intern Fun Days Returned in 2021

June 17, 2021

Jessica LaBella Receives Garden Club of America Scholarship

Holden’s Norweb Fellow, Jessica LaBella, has been selected as this year’s recipient of the Corliss Knap Engle Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded from the Garden Club of America in collaboration with the Botanic Gardens Conservation International – U.S.

Jessica LaBella Receives Garden Club of America Scholarship

June 11, 2021

Homogenized Biota in an Era of Urban Expansion and Globalization

By Caleb Lumsden, Research Department Intern

Research Department intern Caleb Lumsden shares his knowledge on biotic homogenization in today’s Science on Fridays with Holden blog.

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Homogenized Biota in an Era of Urban Expansion and Globalization

June 4, 2021

2021 Holden Summer Intern Program

By Na Wei, PhD, Scientist

The HF&G’s Research, Community Forestry and Conservation teams are excited about the arrival of the 2021 cohort of interns. This year, HF&G leverages resources and opportunities across departments and campuses to allow our interns gain the finest in knowledge, experience, and skills for future career success.

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2021 Holden Summer Intern Program

May 21, 2021

Hot in the city – Can tree seedlings from urban areas beat the heat?

By Sharon Danielson, MS, Doctoral Graduate Student

Urban development is expanding rapidly, leaving a patchwork of small, isolated forests in its wake. Urban areas tend to have more paved surfaces that retain heat leading to an urban heat island effect. Nearby, forests are subjected to higher temperatures leading to higher evaporative demand from leaf surfaces while soil compaction and altered water flow can lead to limited soil water availability. This may be particularly detrimental for young seedlings that are vulnerable to desiccation.

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Hot in the city – Can tree seedlings from urban areas beat the heat?

May 19, 2021

Na Wei is Lead Author on a Paper in Molecular Ecology

Holden Scientist, Na Wei is the lead author on a paper titled “Pollinators mediate floral microbial diversity and microbial network under agrochemical disturbance.” This research is published in the March issue of Molecular Ecology.

Na Wei is Lead Author on a Paper in Molecular Ecology

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