Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative

The GLB FHC is sponsored by Holden Forests & Gardens, American Forests, and the USDA Forest Service with funding support from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The GLB FHC is here to support a network of partners in tree resistance-breeding activities for forest species that are threatened by invasive insects and diseases.

The primary mission is to use a participatory approach by provide training and technology transfer to a network of partners. The GLB FHC serves as a liaison between research facilities, interested agencies, organizations and citizens to transfer pertinent technology that promotes accelerated production of improved seedlings for future restoration plantings.

The process of breeding trees for resistance takes time and space but is worth the effort as it creates resistant trees using locally adapted individuals. We are available for training partners interested in using their organization to find our current priority species on their property, as well as assessing and monitoring priority species over time for partially resistant individuals. We can also assist with training partners in other tree breeding activities such as, seed collection & storage, germination, scion collection for hot callus grafting or bud grafting, and planting grafted trees for research.

Current Happenings:

In August we will be providing a training on how to identify a lingering ash tree and report it if it is still healthy. This will be done in person in SE & SW Michigan for the DNR forest stewards volunteers, but video will be posted online after the events. Stay tuned for a link to the training.

In September we will be providing a training on how to collect and process eastern hemlock seeds as a part of our preparation for seed collection in October. Anyone who would like to assist with seed collection and processing in October will need to attend the September training. We are planning on eastern hemlock seed collections to be deposited for long term storage at the National Seed Lab, to ensure conservation of the species genetic variation.


Learn more about activities occurring for each of our current priority species:

Ash Trees

Ash Trees

Fraxinus

Workshops can be done as webinars or as in-person field trainings when and where applicable due to coronavirus restrictions:

  • Forest monitoring plot set-up: Procedures on how to set up and collect data in ash forested areas. Setting up your monitoring plots in the same way as the Forest Service allows for analyses to be comparable. Click here for more info on this topic
  • EAB trapping: Procedures on how to set up and collect data on EAB presence.
  • Lingering ash identification & surveys: How to identify the five main ash (Fraxinus) species and what to look for in trees to determine if they are “lingering”. How to conduct tree surveys to find lingering ash trees.
  • Reporting trees using phone apps: How to identify the five main ash (Fraxinus) species and what to look for in trees to determine if they are “lingering”. How to conduct tree surveys to find lingering ash trees.
  • Ash seed collection, stratification, and germination: How to collect ash tree seeds, store seed, the process of seed stratification to induce germination, and best practices for successful germination.
  • Ash scion collection for hot callus and/or bud grafting: How to collect ash tree scion to be used for grafting, which creates ash tree clones. Hot callus grafting and bud grafting can be reviewed, as well as best greenhouse practices for ash.
  • Establishing plantings for clone banks or progeny tests on partner properties: How to set up your own clone bank on your property or how to set up Forest Service progeny tests on your property.

Seeds should be collected in order to make sure we have enough within species diversity to examine tree resistance:

Beech Trees

Beech Trees

Fagus

Workshops can be done as webinars or as in-person field trainings when and where applicable due to coronavirus restrictions:

  • Forest monitoring plot set-up: Procedures on how to set up and collect data in forested areas. Setting up your monitoring plots in the same way as the Forest Service allows for analyses to be comparable.
  • Beech identification & surveys: How to identify beech trees (Fagus americana) and set up forest surveys for healthy and diseased individuals.
  • Reporting diseased trees using phone apps: How to choose and use an app for reporting beech trees or other trees of concern.
  • Beech seed collection and storage: How to collect seeds and store seeds from American beech.
  • Beech seed germination and grafting: How to conduct the process of seed stratification to induce germination and best practices for successful germination. How to collect beech scion and use them for grafting, hot-callus grafting and best greenhouse practices will also be reviewed.

Seeds should be collected in order to make sure we have enough within species diversity to examine tree resistance:

Eastern Hemlock Trees

Eastern Hemlock Trees

Tsuga canadensis

Workshops can be done as webinars or as in-person field trainings when and where applicable due to coronavirus restrictions:

  • Forest monitoring plot set-up:Procedures on how to set up and collect data in forested areas. Setting up your monitoring plots in the same way as the Forest Service allows for analyses to be comparable.
  • Eastern hemlock identification and surveys: How to identify eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and set up forest surveys for healthy and diseased individuals.
  • Reporting trees using phone apps: How to choose and use an app for reporting eastern hemlock trees or other trees of concern.
  • Eastern hemlock seed collection and storage: How to collect and store seeds for eastern hemlock.
  • Eastern hemlock seed germination and cuttings: How to conduct the process of seed stratification to induce germination and best practices for successful germination. How to collect and prepare cuttings in order to create eastern hemlock clones.

Seeds should be collected in order to make sure we have enough within species diversity to examine tree resistance:

Get in Touch

Rachel Kappler, PhD

Rachel Kappler, PhD

Forest Health Coordinator

Rachel Kappler is the liaison between partners of the GLB Forest Health Collaborative. She hosts workshops, webinars, trainings for partners to help achieve their forest health goals. In addition, she helps facilitate partners tree activities for our current priority species. If you have any questions for Rachel, please email her at rkappler@holdenfg.org.

The Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative is initiated by individuals from the following organizations:

Holden Forests & Garens
USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station
American Forests Cleveland, OH Roots of Rock Project

Current Partners

Forest Regeneration Specialist Carolyn Pike
Ohio Department of Natural Resources
Cleveland Metroparks
Morton Arboretum Resistant Cultivars Project

Future Partners

If you are interested in being a part of the Great Lakes Basin Forest Health Collaborative, please contact Rachel Kappler at rkappler@holdenfg.org.

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