Adam Hoke, MS

Research Specialist

Soil Ecology

Education

  • M.S. | 2015 | Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
  • B.S | 2006 | Gannon University, Biochemistry

Research Interests

I joined the Research Department in February of 2016 as a member of David Burke’s lab. My work at Holden has allowed me the opportunity to study many aspects of forest ecology, focusing specifically on multicellular pests and microorganisms, and how they interact with higher trophic life forms. Over the past few years, I have studied the effects acid rain deposition has had on microbial diversity in mature hardwood forests, as well as mycorrhizal fungi and extracellular enzyme activity associated with root mats in mature temperate forests. Currently, I am working on an ongoing, collaborative project investigating the cause and widespread proliferation of Beech Leaf Disease (BLD). As we continue to monitor the effects of invasive pests and climate change in high-profile ecosystems, it’s important to remember that NE Ohio is in no way immune to these same stressors. The goal of my research is to 1.) Understand the role that microorganisms play in not only the degradation, but also the maintenance of diverse ecosystems and 2.) Help educate others on the importance of microorganisms and how their response to continued changes in our climate will ultimately shape our future.

Select Publications

  • Burke D.J., Carrino-Kyker S.R., Chervenak C.F., Hoke A.J., and Hewins C.R. (2020 In review) The function of root mat fungal communities:  Changes in response to pH and phosphorus addition. Plants, People, Planet.
  • Reed S.E., Greifenhagen S., Yu Q., Hoke A.J., Burke D.J., Carta L.K., Handoo Z.A., Kantor M.R., Koch J. (2020) Foliar nematode, Litylenchus crenatae ssp. mccannii, population dynamics in leaves and buds of beech leaf disease affected trees in Canada and the US. Forest Pathology DOI: 10.1111/efp.12599.
  • Burke D.J., Hoke A.J., and Koch J. (2020) The emergence of beech leaf disease in Ohio:  Probing the plant microbiome in search of the cause. Forest Pathology DOI:  10.1111/efp.12579. 1-12.
  • Burke D.J., Carrino-Kyker S.R., Hoke A., Cassidy S., Bialic-Murphy L., and Kalisz S. (2018) Deer and invasive plant removal alters mycorrhizal fungal communities and soil chemistry: Evidence from a long-term field experiment. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 128: 13-21.

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